Women in the bike industry: leading the way at Trek


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Things are changing in the bike industry. Ever-increasing numbers of women are bringing their expertise and experience to a variety of roles. Some are behind the scenes, some in the public eye, but all of them are blazing a trail not only for other women within the industry, but also in how the cycling industry itself caters to women riders.

We spoke to three women holding key roles at Trek about how they’re making their mark. We asked them for their views on the changing world of cycling, and their hopes for the future.

Related: Jessica Klodnicki ‘We wanted to reset’: Bell Helmets on remodelling a ‘masculine’ cycling brand

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Mio Suzuki, Aerodynamics Analysis Engineer, Trek

“I’m responsible for providing data and insights on aerodynamics of cycling, including elements like helmets and wheels. My two main tasks are running computational analysis (Computational Fluid Dynamics, CFD) to virtually optimise designs, and coordinating wind tunnel tests to test physical prototypes. 

“My portion of analysis figures out how to make the top riders go even faster. Typically, my analysis results are combined with the structural analysis, lots of fine detailed engineering, and industrial designing efforts to make a final product.”

What is your background and how did you come to work at Trek? 

How did you get into cycling?

The bike industry has traditionally had a very male-dominated workforce. Do you think this is changing? 

Do you think more could be done to encourage women into the industry?

The theme of International Women’s Day 2016 is ‘pledge for parity’ – what is the one most important thing that needs to be done or to happen for parity within cycling?

Emily Bremer, Women’s Marketing Manager, Trek

What is your background and how did you come to work at Trek? 

How did you get into cycling?

The bike industry has traditionally had a very male-dominated workforce. Do you think this is changing?

Do you think more could be done to encourage women into the industry?

What is the one most important thing that needs to be done or to happen for parity within cycling?

Jenn Campbell, Design Engineer, Mountain Bike Department, Trek

What is your background and how did you come to work at Trek?

The bike industry has traditionally had a very male-dominated workforce. Do you think this is changing? 

What is the one most important thing that needs happen for parity within cycling?

You can read more at BikeRadar.com

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